Generation Energy: Planning the future of Canada's energy framework

Posted by: Alycia Lowdon on October 31, 2017

Generation Energy is a public consultation about Canada’s energy future. This Government of Canada initiative seeks different perspectives about what the energy industry, and energy policies should look like for future generations. Working with the Canadian Energy Pipeline Association, we hosted a stakeholder workshop with Calgary leaders in industry, the energy service sector, the indigenous community, and academia to outline long-term challenges and opportunities for Calgary’s, and Canada’s energy future. 

The submission summarizes the workshop’s findings, and has been submitted for consideration into the Generation Energy outcomes.

What is Generation Energy? 

Generation Energy is a public consultation about the future of Canada’s energy policy. This Government of Canada initiative seeks different perspectives about what Canada’s energy industry, and energy policies should look like for future generations. The consultation period lasted 25 weeks, with the federal government receiving over 350,000 submissions.  

The consultation culminated in a forum held in Winnipeg on October 11-12, 2017, where Minister of Natural Resources, Jim Carr, met with leaders in industry, academia, and the public to discuss the future of Canadian energy policies. The federal government will likely use the feedback heard from stakeholders at the forum, and throughout the consultation period, as a guide when developing the future of Canada’s energy policy framework.  

Click here to find more about Generation Energy and the Government of Canada’s consultations. 

Our advocacy 

Prior to the Winnipeg forum, on the morning of October 2, 2017, the Chamber worked with the Canadian Energy Pipeline Association (CEPA) to host a stakeholder workshop. Calgary leaders in industry, the energy service sector, the indigenous community, and academia participated to outline long-term challenges and opportunities for Calgary’s, and Canada’s energy future.  

Here’s a summary of the topics discussed at the workshop:

  1.  Economics and competitiveness – Participants agreed that Canada needs to develop a national energy strategy that does not place onerous costs on industry. Many participants also believe that Canada needs better access to foreign markets for its energy exports. 
  2. Environmental responsibility – Canada needs to do a better job communicating our environmental successes, and take more pride in being environmental stewards. Participants also acknowledged that Canada needs to increase regulatory certainty to encourage consistency over time.  
  3. Indigenous engagement and participation – Participants acknowledged that Canada’s energy industries need to develop meaningful partnerships with Indigenous peoples, and ensure that Indigenous groups are included in the regulatory process, as well as project planning. 
  4. Long term strategies for oil and gas – Participants recognized the need for the federal government to develop an energy policy framework that increases public confidence in the regulatory process, and encourages investment through greater certainty.  

Using the feedback from our workshop, we worked with CEPA to provide a joint submission to the Minister of Natural resources outlining where the business community foresees areas of concern, and future opportunities.  

We are anticipating a report outlining what the federal government heard throughout the Generation Energy consultations. The feedback outlined within the report will likely guide the federal government’s development of Canada’s future energy policies. 

We will analyze this report as soon as it is released, and continue to advocate for a policy framework that places minimal burdens on our energy industry.