Transportation and Mobility

Transportation and Mobility

Download our full Great Calgary 2013 policy book

The efficient and effective movement of people, goods, and services is essential to Calgary’s status as a major North American transportation hub. This requires finding new ways of keeping traffic and people moving during peak hours, while still providing citizens a choice when it comes to mobility.

Statistics Canada’s 2010 General Social Survey shows that Calgary has commute times similar to the national average for Canadian cities over a population of 1 million.  The City of Calgary’s Calgary Transportation Plan, which was published in 2009, highlighted The City of Calgary’s commitment to lowering the city’s reliance on personal vehicles. How do we ensure that continued productivity is not lost to commuting and that goods are delivered without experiencing delays as they come through Calgary?

Continuing to simply expand Calgary’s road capacity is neither cost-efficient nor sustainable in the long term. Congestion in a city like Los Angeles ,  shows that building roads without offering mobility alternatives only makes the problem worse. Instead, Calgary needs to offer more mobility options, and create maximum efficiency in its existing transportation infrastructure in addition to developing new infrastructure to give Calgarians a choice. This is the best possible way to ensure that businesses keep working and citizens get where they need to, when they need to.

Significant progress has been made in expanding Calgary’s primary transit network. The opening of the West LRT provides a mass transit option for more citizens and City Council approved the 30-year transit plan RouteAhead in 2012. However, existing infrastructure is still not being used to its maximum potential, and The City of Calgary has yet to determine how to fund RouteAhead. By expanding transit options for citizens and providing incentives for alternative forms of transit, the city can begin to move more people on the same roads, reducing congestion and commute times.

In order to keep Calgarians moving and ensure that citizens and businesses can get goods and services where and when they need to, The Calgary Chamber recommends The City of Calgary:

  • Expand the primary transit network to better service new communities, and increase transit frequency and capacity in higher traffic areas.
  • Continue to pursue transit-oriented development, where appropriate.
  • Expand the use of high occupancy vehicle lanes, including existing bus-only lanes to accommodate other high-occupancy vehicles.
  • Continue to increase inner city parking efficiency through floating prices based on demand and limiting high demand areas to short-stay parking.

Download our full Great Calgary 2013 policy book

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