Corporate Athletes: The mindset of a leader

March 4, 2020
11:30 am -  
1:30 pm
The Westin Calgary
320 4 Ave SW, Calgary, AB T2P 2S6

*Registration works best when using Google Chrome.

Athletes and business leaders share many parallels on mindset. Both are able to perform in high stress situations, achieve big goals, and push themselves to reach new heights. Join us for the first of a three part series where we explore what it takes to succeed at the highest level, from the playing field to the boardroom.

Three of Canada’s top female leaders will share how they have overcome barriers as athletes, in their work, and personal lives, and how their athletic successes have made them great leaders. Speakers will share key insights on what it takes to be a leader and how to build a strong mindset to get there.

Proceeds from the event will support community sport outreach and education.

The event is in celebration of International Women’s Day and this year’s theme of Each for Equal.

Tickets

  • Single ticket: $89.00
  • Table of eight: $712.00

Speakers

  • Cassie Campbell-Pascall, Two time Olympic Champion, Broadcaster
  • Dr. Penny Werthner, Olympian, Dean of Kinesiology, University of Calgary
  • Zahra Alharazi, Author, CEO, My Skillit
  • Moderated by Catriona Le May Doan, O.C., Two time Olympic Champion, President and CEO, Sport Calgary   

About the speakers

Cassie Campbell-Pascall

Cassie Campbell won 21 medals with Canada’s National Women’s teams, including 17 gold medals and four silver medals

Won two Olympic gold medals (2002- Salt Lake City and 2006 – Turin, Italy), and one Olympic silver medal (1998 – Nagano, Japan).

A six-time World Champion gold medallist (1994, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2001 and 2004), and won silver at the 2005 worlds once

Cassie Campbell is the only captain, male or female, to lead Canada to two Olympic gold medals. When Cassie Campbell was dressed for Team Canada, her team had a 129-26-2 record.

Cassie Campbell was Captain of Canada’s National Women’s Team from 2001 to her retirement in 2006, which made her the longest serving captain in Canadian hockey history. Cassie Campbell was an alternate captain with Canada’s National Women’s Team from 1997-2001, receiving this honor just prior to her second World Championship appearance.

In 157 career games with Team Canada, Cassie Campbell had 32 goals, 68 assists, 100 points, 66 penalty minutes. (Four of her career goals were short-handed and three were game winning goals).

Cassie Campbell’s 100 points rank her 8th all-time with Team Canada’s National Women’s program:

157 games played ranks 5th all-time 32 goals ranks 9th all-time 68 assists ranks 6th all-time 66 penalty minutes ranks10th all-time From 1994 through 1998, Cassie Campbell played as a defenceman with Canada’s National Women’s Team, and was named to 1997 IIHF World Women’s Championship All-Star Team as a defenceman. Cassie Campbell switched to forward prior to the 1999 World Championship.

Dr. Penny Werthner

Penny Werthner, PhD, is the Dean of the Faculty of Kinesiology at the University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada, which is currently ranked the #1 School of Sport Science in North America and #7 globally. Her research is in the area of life-long learning, particularly in the area of high-performance coaches; women and sport; and the use of heart rate variability biofeedback and neurofeedback for optimal performance in high performance sport.

Werthner is also one of Canada’s most distinguished consultants in the field of sport psychology and leadership behavior. She has worked with many Olympic level athletes, coaches and teams (Athletics, Canoe/Kayak, Rowing, Freestyle Ski, Speed Skating, Curling, Women’s Hockey and Women’s Soccer, to name a few) over the span of 13 summer and winter Olympic Games, from the 1988 winter Olympic Games in Calgary, Canada to the more recent 2016 summer Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and the 2018 Olympic Games in PyeongChang, Korea.

Werthner is a former Olympic athlete in Athletics (represented Canada at the 1976 Summer Olympics in the women’s 1,500m (and the 1980 Olympic Games in Moscow, if Canada had not boycotted the Games). Penny won a bronze medal in the women’s 800m at the 1971 Pan American Games in Cali, Colombia, a bronze in the 800m at 1979 Pan American Games in Puerto Rico, and a bronze in the 1500m at the 1978 Commonwealth Games in Edmonton, Alberta.

Zahra Al-Harazi

 Zahra is currently co-founder of Skillit, an experiential marketplace for skills. Prior to Skillit, Zahra was the CEO and founder of Foundry Communications, a multiple international award winning marketing and communications studio. Foundry was recognize by Profit magazine and one of the most profitable companies in Canada on its W100 list.

She is an internationally acclaimed speaker, represented by Speaker’s Spotlight and her first book, “What It Takes”, will be published by Harper Collins in Jan. 2020.

Zahra sits on The Walrus board of directors. She the former Chair of the Fund Development Committee for the Werklund School of Education at the University of Calgary, the EO Global Communications Committee, Toronto Board of directors for Entrepreneurs Organization as the Finance Chair, the The OGM Editorial Advisory Board, Global Transportation Hub board and the National Make-a-Wish Foundation Board. In addition, she served as the Canadian Ambassador to UNICEF for four years.

She is one of Calgary’s Top 40 Under 40, Business in Calgary’s “Leader of Tomorrow”, Canadian Woman Entrepreneur of the Year – Chatelaine, one of Canada’s 100 most powerful women – WXN and has received the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee medal for contributions to Canada and the RBC Top 25 Immigrants to Canada Award.

Catriona Le May Doan, O.C. 

 Catriona Le May Doan was the fastest woman on ice. After carrying the Canadian flag into the 2002 Olympic Winter Games opening ceremonies (her fourth Olympics), Catriona defended her Olympic title with a Gold medal performance in the 500 metre event, becoming the first Canadian individual, and the only female Canadian individual, to defend a gold medal at any Olympic games. She held the World Record in the 500m for 10 years and still currently holds the Olympic Record. During her career, Catriona broke 13 World Records.

In 1998, at the Nagano Olympic Winter Games, Catriona won her first Olympic Gold medal in the 500m in Olympic record time, then added an Olympic Bronze Medal in the 1000m event. She finished the 1998 season first overall in the World Cup standings in both the 500m and 1000m events. In 1999 Catriona’s domination in the speed skating world continued when she finished first overall in the World Cup standings for the 500m event.

Catriona’s accomplishments have earned her the 2002 Lou Marsh Award as Canada’s Athlete of the Year and she is a three-time recipient (1998, 2001, 2002) of the Bobbie Rosenfeld Award for Canadian Female Athlete of the Year award.

In addition to being a world champion athlete, Catriona is a talented motivational speaker. She is an articulate, engaging and bilingual presenter, exploring with her audiences the method of achieving personal excellence while challenging and motivating people to achieve their full potential.

Catriona is an ambassador for the Spina Bifida and Hydrocephalus Association of Canada, and Special Olympics Canada.

She was on the Vancouver 2010 Olympic Organizing Committee Board and is a Board member of Canada Games Council, and the Canadian Sport Institute Calgary and Winsport. She is also a spokesperson for Saskatchewan Blue Cross.

Catriona has covered five Olympic Games and co-hosted the primetime show Countdown to Beijing. She joined the CTV Olympic broadcast team for the Vancouver 2010 Games, which earned her a Gemini for Best Sports Analyst. Catriona co-hosted Olympic Morning for the London 2012 Games.  In Pyeongchang 2018, she served as Lead Athlete Mentor for the Canadian Olympic Team.

Catriona has received three Honorary Degrees from the University of Calgary, the University of Saskatchewan and the University of Regina and gave the convocation speech to their graduating classes.

Catriona was inducted into Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame and the Canadian Olympic Committee’s Sports Hall of Fame and appointed an Officer of the Order of Canada.